Meet Erin Bryant!

Erin%20Bryant

While Erin’s kindergarten classmates were learning how to make patterns she was using them to learn how to balance on one leg, with both eyes closed. It’s not a coincidence that she is helping our patients do the same thing today. She has been a great addition to the Makovicka Physical Therapy staff in helping our patients with balance and vestibular conditions. We can only hope that she’ll start taking out her anger from the blackjack losses in a better way than hiding playing cards around the clinics.

Erin was born in Michigan, but raised in Lincoln, Nebraska. Before finding her passion as a physical therapist, Erin was an avid powerlifter as a competitor, organizer of meets and representing athletes across Nebraska.  Her lifting career came to a close as a member of the 2002 USA Junior National powerlifting team, competing in the World Championships in Sochi, Russia. She received her Bachelor’s degree in psychology at UNL, and went on to earn a Doctor of Physical Therapy degree at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. She is an experienced orthopedic therapist as well as a Herdman Certified vestibular specialist, assessing and treating all varieties of dizziness/vertigo and balance disorders.

Meet Tony Hentzen!

Tony%20Hentzen
Tony tends to walk on the wild side. Don’t mention skydiving or cliff jumping to him. They don’t produce enough adrenaline. When he’s not submerged in a tank of piranhas, he is helping our patients recover and getting back to what they love doing most. We are very thankful for the work Tony has done and we’re excited to see him grow. How did Tony get to where he is today?

Tony was born and raised in Seward, Nebraska. After graduating from high school, he attended the University of Nebraska-Lincoln where he received his bachelor degree in biology. Tony then went on to attend the University of Nebraska Medical Center where he received his Doctorate of Physical Therapy degree. Tony’s clinical interests are in orthopedics and geriatrics. Tony is a current member of the American Physical Therapy Association and the Nebraska Physical Therapy Association.

What is Pitcher’s Elbow?

Pitcher’s elbow is a form of tendonitis, which is caused by overuse or movement patterns performed in a repeated fashion. Its important to recover completely before continuing the activity to allow for the inflammation and irritation to decrease. Depending on the severity of the injury this may include just a reduction of practice time or pitch counts, or not practicing altogether.

For more on how to prevent pitcher’s elbow, please see our injury prevention page on the topic.

Symptoms

  • Pain will gradually increase
  • Pain might also be sudden if calcium deposits are present
  • Point tenderness at the site

As soon as you start to feel pain be sure to ice the injured area for 15-20 minutes at a time every hour at the most. Stretching and strengthening exercises will help in the recovery of golfer’s elbow.

Treatment

  • Physical Therapy to strengthen the muscles surrounding the injured joints.
  • Ice 15-20 minutes every hour at the most to decrease swelling and pain.
  • Range of motion exercises

Sources:

Meet Michelle Ripperger!

Michelle%20Ripperger

Although Michelle supports the Hawkeyes on the outside, she’ll tell you she wears a Husker shirt under all her Iowa apparel…keeping it closer to her heart. Next time you see her ask her how she feels about the Cyclones. Michelle has been an amazing addition the the Makovicka Physical Therapy team and brings a great attitude each and every day. Some of Michelle’s favorite past-times include running, playing softball for the Makovicka team, and reading anatomy books (for fun).

Michelle was born and raised in Urbandale, Iowa where she attended Urbandale High school.  After graduation, she moved to Pella, Iowa to attend Central College.  Michelle was a member of the Dutch volleyball team for 4 years and graduated with a Bachelors degree in Exercise Science. She then moved to Omaha to continue her education at the University of Nebraska Medical Center where she earned a  Doctor of Physical Therapy degree.  Michelle has a strong interest in orthopedics and also has clinical experience in pediatrics, aquatic therapy, and acute care.  Michelle is a member of the American Physical Therapy Association and the Nebraska Physical Therapy Association

Meet Zach Kramper!

Zach%20Kramper
“Mike, Mike, Mike, Mike, Mike! Can you guess what day it is?” Well in Zach’s world it’s always hump day. Zach joined our team back in August and is working out of our Papillion clinic. If you haven’t met Zach or spent time with him you might not know that although he attended Creighton University, he tends to cheer for the Huskers. That’s what he does now. To see how he got here, continue reading.

Zach was born in Sioux City, Iowa and raised near rural Ponca, Nebraska (Nebraska’s fourth oldest town). Following graduation from Ponca High School, he moved to Omaha where he attended Creighton University and earned his Bachelor of Health Science and Doctorate of Physical Therapy degrees. Currently, he is working to complete an orthopedic residency program through a partnership of Creighton University with Makovicka Physical Therapy. Zach is a member of the American Physical Therapy Association and the Nebraska Physical Therapy Association.

The Lisfranc Injury: The Fantasy Football Nightmare

If you follow football; real or fantasy, you have probably heard about a player with a Lisfranc injury.  This year alone Le’Veon Bell, Santonio Holmes, and Ryan Clady all were victims of the uncommon injury. So, in the words of Jerry Seinfeld, “Who is this Liz Franc, and where does she come from?”  The term Lisfranc originates from a French doctor, Jacques Lisfranc de St. Martin during the 1800s, after French troops reported pain while riding horses.  The injury refers to a ligament sprain and/or fracture at the midfoot, affecting the tarsometatarsal joint that connects the small tarsal bones in the foot to the larger metatarsal bones.

Causes

                  A Lisfranc injury generally occurs with a high energy movement such as a car accident or fall.  However, the injury is being diagnosed more frequently in athletics as the diagnostic skill improves.  Typically, the injury happens in sports when a player is in a plantar-flexed position (on the front foot), while someone falls or steps on the heel.

Lisfranc_injury

Diagnosis

                  Typically localized pain, diffuse swelling, and limited weight-bearing are signs and symptoms of this injury.  In addition, an X-ray or MRI may be necessary to grade the severity.

Treatment

                  If a fracture is detected then surgery is usually indicated.  The surgery will likely consist of an open reduction and internal fixation with plates and screws.  This hardware is usually removed in a couple of months.  In more severe cases, the joint may be fused.  After the surgery is allowed to heal, rehabilitation should be started to reduce any atrophy, range of motion loss, swelling, and regain gait mechanics.  If a fracture is not detected, a period of immobilization followed by rehabilitation is indicated.

“Like” us on Facebook and “Follow” us on Twitter for more information and giveaways!

The Nagging Turf Toe Injury

Turf toe is one of those injuries that doesn’t seem to go away once it arises. This is a term that the coaching staff never wants to hear because of how much it can affect a player’s performance.

Causes

Turf toe is described as sprains to the ligaments of the big toe. The injury typically is acute and happens when a player is running on an artificial turf field or when excess force is put on the big toe. The artificial turf isn’t as forgiving as regular grass and can grab the cleat not allowing the toe to lift off the ground. This is what increases the risk for injuring those ligaments.

It typically occurs in football players but can also happen to athletes participating in baseball, soccer, gymnastics, dance, and wrestling.

Symptoms

The most common symptoms include pain and swelling at the base of the big toe. There might also be a limited range of motion with the big toe as the ligaments that support it are injured. If the injury occurs suddenly, there may be a “pop” associated with it and can immediately become painful and worsen within the next 24 hours.

Treatments

Since turf toe has the tendency of being an acute injury, the basic treatment consists of the R.I.C.E method.

  • Rest: Give yourself time to heal by keeping weight off your ankle. Crutches may help you get around if the pain doesn’t go away.
  • Ice: Make sure to ice right after the injury to decrease the pain and swelling. Ice 15-20 minutes every couple hours for the first few days or until pain and swelling has decreased.
  • Compression: By using an elastic bandage, you can decrease the swelling. Make sure to start wrapping the bandage at your toes and work your way towards your leg.
  • Elevation: Prop your ankle up using a pillow or bolster.

Be sure to check with your physician if you or the coaching staff deems it necessary. They may prescribe over-the-counter medications, as well as time away from practice to allow for the joint and ligaments to heal.

Physical therapy might be advised to regain range of motion and strength in the joint and ligaments of the toe. Not only could this help speed up recovery but it can help prevent Turf Toe from ever happening or happening again.

Sources:

#MakovickaPT contest winners!

Again, we can’t thank everyone enough for their input and entries for our #MakovickaPT contest! The point of the contest was to be able to see what our patients were able to do after having physical therapy. The beauty of it is that each person had a different view on what that may have been. From getting back to exercising and spending more time with family to progressing from a walker to a cane, we had it all. As you progress through physical therapy, it is very easy to get discouraged if the results aren’t coming as fast as you expected. Our therapists know and understand what you are going through and are excited to help you get back to what you love most! No matter how small your goal might be, it is accomplishing it that makes all the hard work worth it.

Below are the winners as well as the rest of the entries that we received! If you haven’t yet “Liked” us on Facebook or followed us on Twitter, this would be an awesome time to do so!

contest4

1st Place: “It’s the small accomplishments that keep me going! Physical therapy helped me trash my walker and move onto the cane.”

contest10

2nd Place: “Physical therapy has helped me so much and has taken away the pain in my foot. I’ve been able to jump so much better.”

contest3

3rd Place: “PT help me be able to work out again to help me lose 40lbs”

contest8

 

Honorable Mention

contest15

 

Honorable Mention: “Physical therapy allowed me to get outside and play soccer with my kids!”

 

 

 

contest

 

Honorable Mention: “Thanks Joel, Dan, Sarah , Mitch and Casey for getting me running again #MakovickaPT

 

 

1375245_612878368764902_1605848518_n

Makovicka Physical Therapy really helped me recover from my hip and knee injuries. So I can go back to doing what I love. Soccer!”

contest1 contest2contest5 contest6 contest14 contest13 contest12 contest11 contest9 contest7

 

And a very, very special thanks to WebPT (@WebPT) and Dr. Ben Fung (@DrBenFung) for submitting these great entries below! It’s great to see how widespread the benefits of physical therapy can be.

 

 

BS3Sh77CEAA0zX- BS7ua_3CMAAHFQT BTICYDOCcAEBG2L BTQ3mwPIQAESwaT

The News about Brain Injuries

We’re approaching the halfway point of the high school football season and the competition level is as high as it’s ever been. The unfortunate thing is that brain injuries are starting to arise. These injuries can be difficult to prevent even if you’re doing the necessary steps (see below). The bad news is that we’re also hearing of players covering up their symptoms and not receiving the proper information on treatment. Injuries to the head can cause far worse damage then one might think. Anything from experiencing no symptoms at all (but still sustain a concussion) to life-altering traumatic brain injuries (TBI).

What used to be the most overlooked part of the body (in terms of training) until recent NFL lawsuits is starting to become a focus point of companies around the country. Companies are claiming that their products might help reduce the chances of sustaining a head injury or speeding up the diagnosis process. Are these products worth the money? It’s hard to say but something that might help player safety that doesn’t cost a penny is awareness.

The more we know about traumatic brain injuries the better we can prepare our athletes and the faster we can diagnose an injury to ensure that they aren’t playing through it. According to the CDC, older adolescents (15-19 yrs.) are some of the most at risk age group to sustain a TBI. What does this all mean in terms of football?

What kind of hits can cause a TBI? It can be anything from major hits that cause unconsciousness to a normal tackle or block to the helmet. It is still difficult to determine the amount of force and direction from which the blow comes from that causes these brain injuries. When these injuries occur, specifically in football, they may cause symptoms that players can often point out but don’t want to admit to the coaching staff in fear of being benched. Besides those symptoms that appear right away, other symptoms might not arise for days to weeks after the initial injury. This makes it difficult to pinpoint the cause.

Sustaining a traumatic brain injury during football, specifically youth football, can have long-lasting effects. We’re hearing more and more that kids are hiding their symptoms to be able to keep playing either out of fear or competition. Doing this can have life-long effects on their health, and it’s not just a knee that can be repaired, it’s their brain. This can be enhanced by the fact that football players are continuing to hit harder at younger and younger ages while the brain and skull are continuing to develop.

Treatment

Nothing. After being diagnosed with a concussion or TBI the best thing to do is nothing. The obvious things to refrain from include physical contact and activity but some of the other not so obvious are limiting the amount of time that your brain is being used. That may include time home from school, studying, etc. Continue to stay in contact with your doctor or physician as every person is different in how they recover and are effected by a brain injury.

Prevention

Trying to find ways to reduce the risk of your son sustaining a brain injury while playing football besides abstinence? Be sure that their helmet they are using fits correctly and continue to check the fit after games as it may loosen.

If you have further questions as training camps continue and the season nears, please contact us at info@makovickapt.com or give us a call at 402.934.0045. Do everything you can to prevent a traumatic brain injury.

Makovicka Physical Therapy Contest Update

Our contest is up and running and we already have a number of participants showing us how physical therapy has gotten them back to doing what they love most. As we designed this contest we wanted to focus on how our patients viewed the benefits of physical therapy. Is it something as simple as being more mobile so they are able to navigate their home with confidence, getting to spend more time with friends and family doing the things they’re used to doing, or competing at a higher level than before.

As we asked everyone to send us their pictures using #MakovickaPT we began to realize that this contest could have bigger implications to the world of physical therapy than just our clinic! This is why we are introducing #GotPT to the contest. We want this concept of “what physical therapy can allow us to do” to outlast the contest.

To win prizes through our contest still include #MakovickaPT in any of your Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram posts, but help us spread the word and throw in #GotPT so we can keep this concept going after the winners have been announced!

Good luck to everyone and we’re excited to see what physical therapy has allowed everyone to do, from walking and golfing to Division I scholarships and more.

A special shout out to WebPT (@WebPT)  and Dr. Ben Fung (@DrBenFung) for continually challenging the physical therapy community and helping to push this campaign!