How to shop for running/walking shoes.

Shopping Tips:

  1. Look at the general workmanship of the shoe (loose or uneven stitching, sloppy glue, etc.).
  2. Heel counter, the back of the shoe that cups the heel should be stiff and firmly attached.
  3. Run your hand along the inside to feel for any rough edges.
  4. Nylon material is the best for the upper portion of the shoe as it allows the foot to “breathe”.
  5. The weight of the shoe is overrated, do not use as a factor for shoe selection.

Fitting Tips:

  1. Even if the shoe is highly recommended, do not buy it if it does not fit correctly. A shoe that does not fit correctly will not work correctly.
  2. The heel counter should fit snug and firm, but does not dig into your heel. If not, check the width of the shoe.
  3. Allow at least one quarter inch up to a thumb nail beyond the end of your toes.
  4. Feet swell while running so do not choose a shoe that is too tight across the widest area of the forefoot.
  5. Put both shoes on, lace them up, and try them out. If they fit correctly, wear them.
  6. When trying shoes on, wear the socks that you would normally use when running or walking in them. Also, be sure to put the inserts or orthotics in that you would use to be sure they fit correctly.

– Scott Keenan, PT, DPT, OCS, CSCS

Makovicka Physical Therapy

How you or your patients can benefit from the Graston technique.

The Graston technique is one type of Instrumental-Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization (IASTM).  Graston utilizes multiple stainless steel instruments to scan soft tissue and treat any areas of restrictions.  The instruments allow practitioners to determine the appropriate use and pressure used to break up the restrictions.  In addition, Graston practitioners will use the instruments to eliminate any restrictions from the other body parts that may be contributing to your pain.  

By combining this technique with corrective exercise, stretching, and modalities clinicians can help the healing process in rebuilding the appropriate tissue.

The treatment time for each restriction is approximately 30-60 seconds per spot, while bruising and pain are avoided to provide comfort for the patient.

Graston may be incorporated in the treatment of:

Achilles Tendonitis

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome,

Tennis Elbow

Golfer’s Elbow

Lumbar Strain/Sprain

Patellofemoral Dysfunction

Plantar Fasciitis

And many other pathologies

For more information about the Graston Technique call (402) 933-3036 or visit www.makovickapt.com for a list of our 5 convenient Omaha Metro area locations.
Dan McCutchen PT, DPT, OCS